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Douglas  Nelson

Douglas Nelson

Douglas Nelson
Professor Emeritus

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Teaching

Highlights: Cognitive Psychology, Research Methods, and Statistics.

Ph.D. Area: Cognitive & Neural Sciences

Research

Highlights: Memory and cognitive psychology in general. More specifically, the influence of pre-existing knowledge on the recall and recognition of recently experienced information.

Spreading Activation or Spooky Action at a Distance?

Implicitly Activated Memories: The Missing Links of Remembering

Specialty Area

CNS (Cognitive Neuroscience)

Recent Publications

Nelson, D. L., & McEvoy, C. L. (2000). What is this thing called frequency? Memory & Cognition, 28, 509-522.

Nelson, D. L., McEvoy, C. L., & Dennis, S. (2000). What is free association and what does it measure? Memory & Cognition, 28, 887-899.

Nelson, D. L., & Zhang, N. (2000). The ties that bind what is known to the recall of what is new. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 7, 604-617.

Nelson, D. L., Zhang, N., & McKinney, V. M. (2001). The ties that bind what is known to the recognition of what is new. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 27, 1147-1159.

Nelson, D. L., & McEvoy, C. L. (2002). How can the same type of prior knowledge both help and hinder recall? Journal of Memory and Languaeg, 46, 652-663.

Nelson, D. L., & Goodmon, L.B. (in press). Experiencing a Word Can Prime Its Accessibility and Its Associative Connections to Related Words. Memory & Cognition.

Nelson, D. L., McKinney, V. M. , & McEvoy, C. L. (in press). Are Implicitly Activated Associates Selectively Activated? Psychonomic Bulletin & Review.

Nelson, D. L., McEvoy, C. L., & Pointer, L. (submitted). Spooky action at a distance? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition.