People

Faculty

Wendy  Rote

Wendy Rote

Wendy Rote
Assistant Professor

Contact

Office: DAV 114
Phone: 727/873-4957
Email:

Links

Bio

Wendy Rote is an expert in parent-adolescent relationships. As director of the Parent-Adolescent Relationships (PAR) Lab, Rote studies the impacts of parenting on the development of children. The lab is focused on answering questions about how different goals within the relationship between children and parents influence the way family members interact and perceive their interactions. Topics examined include adolescent autonomy development, perceptions of parenting, family decision-making, helicopter parenting and parental psychological control.

Education

M.A., University of Rochester
Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, University of Rochester
Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Positive Youth Development Lab, University of Rochester

Teaching

Rote teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in developmental psychology, statistics and psychological tests and measures. She was awarded the USF Women in Leadership and Philanthropy in 2019. Rote actively publishes papers on her research in peer-reviewed psychology journals and presents her findings at international conferences.

Research

Rote’s research has been supported by numerous grants, such as the Research and Creative Scholarship Grant, which will allow Rote and her lab to study the impact of helicopter parenting on students with disabilities. A USF Nexus Initiative Award, awarded in partnership with a researcher from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, will fund research that examines cultural differences and impacts of overparenting for high school-aged students in the United States and China.

Specialty Area

Cognition, Neuroscience, & Social

Selected Publications

Rote, W. M., Olmo, M., Feliscar, L., Jambon, M., Ball, C., & Smetana, J. G. (2020). Helicopter parenting and perceived overcontrol by emerging adults: A family-level profile analysis. Journal of Child and Family Studies. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-020-01824-z

Rote, W. M., Smetana, J. G., & Feliscar, L. (2020). Longitudinal associations between adolescent information management and mother–teen relationship quality: Between- versus within-family differences. Developmental Psychology. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1037/dev0000947

Smetana, J. G. & Rote, W. M. (2019). Adolescent-parent relationships: Progress, processes, and prospects. Annual Review of Developmental Psychology, 1, 41-68. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-devpsych-121318-084903

Kinney, C., Rote, W. M., & De Lorenzo, R. (2019). Moving versus stopped motor vehicle screen use: Engagement, perceptions, and correlates. Transportation Research Part F: Psychology and Behaviour, 67, 142-154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2019.10.010

Patrick, R.B., Rote, W.M. , Gibbs, J.C., Bodine, A. J., Basinger, K. S. (2019). Defend, stand by, or join in?: The relative influence of moral identity, moral judgment and social self-efficacy on youths’ bystander behaviors in bullying situations. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 48, 2051-2064. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01089-w

Rote, W. M. & Smetana, J. G. (2018). Within-family dyadic patterns of parental monitoring and adolescent information management. Developmental Psychology, 54, 2302-2315. doi:10.1037/dev0000615

Rote, W.M., & Smetana, J. G. (2017). Situational and Structural Variation in Youth Perceptions of Maternal Guilt Induction. Developmental Psychology, 53, 1940-1953. doi:10.1037/dev0000396

Rote, W.M., & Smetana, J. G. (2016). Patterns and predictors of mother-adolescent discrepancies across family constructs. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 2064-2079. doi:10.1007/s10964-016-0515-1

Rote, W.M., & Smetana, J. G. (2016). Beliefs about parents’ right to know: Domain differences and associations with change in concealment. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 26, 334-344. doi: 10.1111/jora.12194

Rote, W.M., & Smetana, J. G. (2015). Acceptability of information management strategies: Adolescents’ and parents’ judgments and links with adjustment and relationships. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 25, 490-505. doi: 10.1111/jora.12143