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PSY 4931 Selected Topics, Community Practicum and Community Internship Course Information

Important: Some Selected Topics courses require the successful completion of Research Methods in Psychology, PSY 3213. Check the individual course descriptions for details.


Community Internship (Summer 2017, CRN 59901, IDS 4942-002; Fall 2017, CRN 94396, IDS 4942-005)

Course Information

Instructor: Summer: TBA; Fall: Dr. Vicky Phares
Time:
Location:

Course Description

Beginning in the Summer of 2016, the USF Department of Psychology will be expanding the internship opportunities for students. The Community Practicum in Mental Health (CLP 4941) internship course will continue to be taught in Fall and Spring, but we will also offer a more flexible Community Internship (IDS 4942) credit option in Fall, Spring, and Summer sessions whereby students can work at pre-approved internship sites or they can seek out their own internship sites and then register for variable amounts of credit depending on their desired work schedule.

Once students secure an internship opportunity (either on their own or via the pre-approved internship list), they should contact the USF community internship instructor to get approval for that internship experience. If not already on the pre-approved list, all internship sites need to be vetted and approved by a faculty member in the USF Department of Psychology.

On-site supervision will be provided at the internship by a professional with at least a Bachelor’s degree and two years of experience in their field. On-site supervisors will need to confirm the students' position at the beginning of the semester and again confirm the students' acceptable work at the end of the semester. For Spring 2017, the instructor is Dr. Vicky Phares: phares@usf.edu

Credits are as follows: 1 credit (for 3 or more hours/week at the internship = 45 total hours), 2 credits (for 4 or more hours/week at the internship = 60 total hours), or 3 credits (for 8 hours/week or more at the internship = 120 total hours), or 4 credits (for 11 hours/week or more at the internship = 165 total hours).

Because the summer term is shorter than the fall or spring, the suggested hours per week for Summer Session C are as follows: 1 credit (for 4 1/2 or more hours/week at the internship = 45 total hours), 2 credits (for 6 or more hours/week at the internship = 60 total hours), or 3 credits (for 12 hours/week or more at the internship = 120 total hours), or 4 credits (for 16 1/2 hours/week or more at the internship = 165 total hours).

The Community Internship (IDS 4942) is offered on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading basis.

Internships can include experiences in any topic that is relevant to psychology, including but not limited to: Mental health, substance abuse, behavioral health, legal issues, forensic psychology, jury selection, community problems, therapeutic communities, industrial organizational psychology, business psychology, human resources, animal behavior, applied behavior analysis, test development, the assessment process, applications of basic research, psychosocial oncology, health sciences, child development, social processes, aging studies, and the elderly.

Please note that no more than 3 hours of PSY 4913 Directed Study, PSY 4970 Honors Thesis, CLP 4941 Community Practicum, or IDS 4942 Community Internship (combined) can count toward the major. Additional credits will count towards general elective credit towards the 120 hours required for the degree. 3 hours of CLP 4941 or IDS 4942 can count towards the minor in Psychology.

Prerequisites

None.

How to Enroll

Course is by instructor approval only. Please send the following information to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu)

  • Your name and U number
  • The number of credit hours in which you will be enrolling
  • The semester you wish to enroll (e.g., Summer 2017 or Fall 2017)
  • If you already have your internship site arranged, please include the name of the internship site and name of your supervisor at the internship site
  • If you need help identifying an internship site, please provide the following information:
  • When you plan to graduate
  • Also, please have a professor, graduate student, or other professional (such as a supervisor from work, even if not psychology-related) confirm the following statement via e-mail to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu): "I support                     ’s request to be assigned to an internship at a community social service agency."


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Community Practicum in Mental Health (Fall 2017, CRN 93753, CLP 4941-002)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Vicky Phares
Time: Fridays 8:00am to 8:50am (plus 8 hours/week in a community agency)
Location: PCD 1147

Course Description

This course is a service learning course where undergraduate students will be assigned to volunteer in a pre-approved community agency for 8 hours/week and will attend a one-hour in-person lecture/discussion. Course material will cover ethics, confidentiality, issues related to mental health, and working in community agencies. Reflective writing assignments will be included in the course. In addition to material posted to Canvas, the required book is:
      Matthews, J.R., & Walker, C. E. (2015). Your practicum in psychology: A guide for maximizing knowledge and competence (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Community agency options include mental health facilities, social service agencies serving impoverished youth and elderly, residential facilities for children in foster care, and prevention programs for youth at risk for mental health problems. On-site supervision will be provided for at least one hour/week of the 8 hour/week commitment. Many agencies require background checks; some require drug screening; some require malpractice insurance ($35).

Once students are approved for the class and given a permit to enroll, they will be asked to rank their preferences for the agency where they would like to gain this experience. Many of the background checks and paperwork will need to be completed long before the start of the semester.

For that reason, priority will be given to students who have enrolled in this class at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester. We hope to have all of the background checks and paperwork done well before the beginning of classes, so that students can gain the full experience of the internship during the semester.

Priority will be given to graduating seniors.

If a student is already volunteering at a community agency and wants to join the course and receive credit for new volunteer hours at that site (8 hours/week plus course attendance and course work during the semester then please email Dr. Phares (phares@usf.edu).

Please note that no more than 3 hours of PSY 4913 Directed Study, PSY 4970 Honors Thesis, CLP 4941 Community Practicum, or IDS 4942 Community Internship (combined) can count toward the major. Additional credits will count towards general elective credit towards the 120 hours required for the degree. 3 hours of CLP 4941 or IDS 4942 can count towards the minor in Psychology.

Prerequisites

None.

How to Enroll

Course is by instructor approval only. Please e-mail Dr. Vicky Phares with the following information (phares@usf.edu):

  • Your name
  • Your U number
  • When you plan to graduate
  • Also, please have a professor, graduate student, or other professional (such as a supervisor from work, even if not psychology-related) confirm the following statement via e-mail to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu): "I support                     ’s request to be assigned to an internship at a community social service agency."


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Discoveries to Gadgets (Fall 2017, CRN 83690, PSY 4931-004)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Emanuel Donchin
Time: Wednesdays, 9:30am to 12:15pm
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

The class will examine the "translational process" where by practical applications are derived from scientific discoveries. The process will be examined in the specific context of the use of recordings of brain activity in the service of various applications.

We will examine several instances in which basic discoveries derived from Electrophysiological, and Radiological, Neuroimaging (i.e. ERP and fMRI) have been put to use in such diverse applications as Brain Computer Interfaces, Guilty Knowledge Tests and Workload assessment, to name a few. In each case, information about how the variance in brain activity can be controlled is used to create a system that can serve a very specific practical need. We will review the scientific foundation for most of the applications we shall examine, which is the P300 component of the human Event Related Potential (ERP). We will then examine the real world problems that were addressed by the various "gadgets" and the logic that is helpful in finding an optimal means for achieving the practical goal. The process of development, from pilot testing to full scale evaluation will be examined in some detail. The course material will be presented mostly in lectures and in readings in the primary literature. Where appropriate lab demonstrations will be provided. Students will be challenged to invent new applications; drawing on the rich base of discoveries in Cognitive Neuroscience Students will undertake class projects that will each examine the possibilities of yet more novel applications of Neuroimaging data in practical applications.

Prerequisites

Prior completion of PSY 3213 is not required.

How to Enroll

A permit is not required for students who have completed PSY 3213. If you have not completed PSY 3213, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx


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The Mind and the Brain (Fall 2017, CRN 83930, PSY 4931-007)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Emanuel Donchin
Time: Mondays, 9:30am to 11:15am
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

This class provides each of the students with the opportunity to examine in detail an issue in the Mind/Brain domain. The students are free to choose any topic that is related to the role of the brain in implementing the Mind and controlling behavior. Students will choose topics and develop a project focusing on their topic. Students can work either individually or in teams.

The course will begin with a series of lectures that will provide a broad survey of Cognitive Neuroscience highlighting the range of topics that match the students' interest. No text book is assigned to the class. The reading materials are all primary scientific papers focused on the student's projects. The relevant papers are uploaded to Canvas.

Students may choose to work as teams of 2 or 3 students per team. A team will be collectively responsible for the team's poster, but each team member will write a separate term paper.

About half way thru the semester class sessions are devoted to cycles of student presentations of their projects as we work to develop the final presentation of the project at the course Grand Finale which is a "Science Fair" that will be held on the last Monday of the semester. Each team will prepare a poster presenting its project. The Science Fair is attended by staff of the Honors College, faculty and students from Psychology and your friends and relatives.

The poster presentations are prepared with Power Point and printed at the campus Computer Store. The printing cost is covered by the course budget.

Each student will have to prepare a written report of the project, at least 8 pages in length. Each member of a team will have to write an individual report.

Prerequisites

Prior completion of PSY 3213 is not required.

How to Enroll

A permit is not required for students who have completed PSY 3213. If you have not completed PSY 3213, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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Judgment and Decision Making (Fall 2017, CRN 89099, PSY 4931-013)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Sandra Schneider
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00pm to 3:15pm
Location: PCD 2124

Course Description

This course provides a broad perspective for understanding and improving human judgment and decision making based on theoretical and empirical advances in the field. The course focuses on the interplay between motivational and cognitive processes that influence the quality of our judgments and decisions. Topics include how we recognize and evaluate situations, how we deal with risk and uncertainty, influences from our previous experiences and our desires, and tradeoffs we make between immediate and longer term goals. Throughout, we will explore evidence suggesting how psychological systems help us to learn, adapt, and to efficiently make decisions, while at the same time leave us prone to various forms of bias and vulnerable to certain kinds of errors in our judgments and decisions. Students will be actively involved in exercises and assignments to increase insight into their own judgment and decision processes.

Prerequisites

  • Junior/senior status (preferred)
  • Overall GPA of 3.2 or better (preferred)
  • Successful completion of PSY 3213 Research Methods (required)

How to Enroll

No advance permission or course permit is required for students who have completed PSY 3213 with a C or better


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The Self (Fall 2017, CRN 91444, PSY 4931-016)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Jamie Goldenberg
Time: Wednesdays, 9:00am to 11:45am
Location: PCD 2125

Course Description

In this course we will discuss a topic that most people find pretty interesting – the self. Of course, the self is pretty complex and has amassed a tremendous literature (a recent PSYCHinfo search on the self revealed over 200,000 entries!), and therefore we can only begin to explore the breadth of this topic. Although we will adopt a primarily social psychological perspective to examine a number of issues related to the self, the self is a topic that is relevant and should be of interest to students from a wide variety of disciplines. Some topic that will be covered are self-conceptions, self-awareness, self-esteem, motives for consistency, coherence, and structure, self-perception and perceptions of will, the self in relation, the body and self, and self-determination and growth. Class meetings will be conducted in seminar format in which empirical and theoretical papers will be discussed and critiqued. The quality of these discussions will depend on the thoughtful input by all participants. In order to facilitate discussion, students will be asked to submit brief reaction papers. In addition, students will also be expected to be the "discussion facilitator" for at least one class. Finally, there is also a more formal research proposal on a topic related to the self.

Prerequisites

Though this is a graduate level course, undergraduates may enroll with permission. Priority will be given to students who meet the following criteria:

  • Junior/Senior status
  • Introduction to Psychological Science, Statistics, Research Methods, and Social Psychology
  • Research experience
  • GPA of 3.5 or higher
  • An interest in applying to graduate school

How to Enroll

First, interested students should email Dr. Goldenberg for permission to register: jgoldenb@usf.edu - the email should explain why they are a good fit for the course and address the recommended criteria. Then, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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Discovering Research in Psychology (Fall 2017, CRN 93450, PSY 4215)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Judith B. Bryant
Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30pm to 1:45pm
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

This course meets the University’s FKL Capstone requirement.

In this course we will explore the science of psychology. The course is designed to stimulate your interest in becoming an active participant in the research process, provide basic research skills, and assist you in finding a research placement. It also aims to familiarize you with some of the kinds of research that faculty and students in the Psychology Department conduct and how and why you might become involved. A third objective of the course is to help you decide whether you wish to conduct research in the Department of Psychology and, if so, facilitate your involvement. This course will also help you decide whether to apply to the department’s Honors Program and ultimately apply to graduate school for a research-related degree. Students who successfully complete this class will be eligible to apply for the department’s Honors Program.

The course will focus on three broad themes: the people, problems, and processes of research. You will learn what kinds of individuals are involved in research, the skills and characteristics they bring to the research endeavor, their professional training, and how they became involved in research. With respect to problems, you will learn about the range of topics often encountered in psychological research. You will also consider the personal and scholarly challenges researchers face in addressing their questions of interest. Finally, you will consider how to identify a good problem, frame a research question, and design a strategy to try to answer the question. In doing so, you will see how systematic inquiry occurs in psychology and be exposed to some methods used for conducting psychological research and how they yield knowledge. As part of the course you will also learn how to analyze research information critically.

Participants will hear presentations by some of the Psychology Department’s most outstanding faculty and student researchers and may take field trips to research sites. To prepare for these classes, you will read journal articles by the researchers and review the researchers’ curriculum vitae (academic resumes). You will also read scholars’ accounts of how they became involved in research. You will reflect on, discuss, and write about these presentations and readings. In addition, you will gain experience in some parts of the research process (e.g., dealing with ethical considerations). Finally, you will explore options for becoming involved in research yourself.

Requirements typically include active participation in the class, short papers about presentations and readings, introductions of and questions for presenters, research brain teasers, a research ethics project, a library resources project, a curriculum vitae and personal statement project, a project discussing possible research placements, and a final exam.

Prerequisites

Selection Criteria

  • Introduction to Psychological Science and Research Methods with grades of B or better,
  • major GPA (including all attempts) of 3.5 or better,
  • overall GPA of 3.25 or better,
  • interest in learning about the research process,
  • and consent of instructor.

Exceptions may be made for students entering USF in summer or fall 2017 from another college or university.

Recommended Criteria

  • strong writing and analytic skills,
  • an interest in becoming involved in research in psychology,
  • intent to graduate no earlier than December 2018 to leave open the possibility of applying to the 2018 Psychology Department Honors Program

How to Enroll

First, complete the online permission to register form found on the Psychology Department website http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit/. Next, please send Dr. Bryant an e-mail (judithbryant@usf.edu) explaining why you think this would be a useful class and how you meet the selection criteria.


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The Nature of Emotion (Fall 2017, CRN 95072, PSY 4931-022)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Geoffrey Potts
Time: Thursdays, 12:30pm to 2:45pm
Location: PCD 2124

Course Description

The purpose of this course is to explore the nature of emotion: what it is, where it comes from, what its functions are, and what it neural underpinnings are. We'll spend little time, if any, looking at the precursors of emotion, primitive motivations, other than the basic appetitive and aversive motivation systems. On the other hand, it's not unreasonable to think that emotion is what motivates behavior or is, at least in part, the subjective experience of motivational systems at work. Why do we execute some behaviors and not others, attend to some things and not others, remember some things better than others? Perhaps motivational systems, experienced as emotions, direct our cognitive systems. We will examine the expression, regulation, and perception of emotion as well as its experience. We will look at some of the models of emotion, for example are individual emotions (e.g. anger, fear, disgust) discrete entities, or are they areas in some dimensional space (e.g. with axes like Valence and Arousal).

This is a reading, writing, and discussion seminar, not a lecture and exam course. We will read journal articles (approximately 3 – 4 per week) on specific topics in emotion. To facilitate discussion, each student will come up with a question about each article each week that came up in the readings. The class period will be spent discussing the papers. Students will write a paper that will be peer reviewed by a subset of their classmates.

Prerequisites

This is a graduate seminar, however, undergraduates may enroll with instructor permission, and may be admitted on a space-available basis. Criteria considered include:

Upper division status (Jr/Sr)
Completed Statistics and Research Methods
Graduate school interest
Verbal and written communication skills

How to Enroll

Interested students should contact Prof. Potts at gfpotts@usf.edu explaining why they want to take the course and what their qualifications are, and to schedule an interview.


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Psychology of Leadership (Fall 2017, CRN 86667, PSY 4931-011)

Course Information

Instructor: Mr. Keaton Fletcher
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:30pm to 7:45pm
Location: PCD 1146

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the psychology of leadership. We will examine many theoretical perspectives on the role, development, and qualities of a leader, specifically in the workplace. A broad overview of various topics and theories within the psychology of leadership will be examined (e.g. trait-based leadership, contingency theories, etc.). The application of major leadership theories will be explored as well as research pertaining to theories and/or applications. The course consists of integrated components of lecture, readings, presentations, discussions, and independent study. At course completion, students should (1) be able to identify and explain some of the major leadership theories, (2) have an expanded appreciation of how research is conducted and disseminated, (3) have the ability to interpret and synthesize research findings in the context of theory, (4) be able to apply theoretical principles to "real-life" case-studies, (5) be able to clearly present information through both written and oral communication

Prerequisites

  • Junior/senior status (preferred)
  • Successful completion of PSY 3213 Research Methods (required)

How to Enroll

No advance permission or course permit is required for students who have completed PSY 3213 with a C or better


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Occupational Health Psychology (Fall 2017, CRN 93495, PSY 4931-012)

Course Information

Instructor: Stephanie Andel
Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30pm to 4:45pm
Location: PCD 1146

Course Description

This course will examine issues related to employee health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically, we’ll discuss how stressors such as work-family conflict, workplace violence, lack of control, and work demands relate to strain outcomes, such as employee anxiety, depression, physical safety, family issues, job satisfaction, and more. We'll also discuss what organizations can do to combat the negative impact of workplace stressors on strain outcomes in order to ultimately enhance employee wellness.

This will be a seminar style course, in which students will be expected to read and discuss weekly research articles, and will ultimately be asked to develop their own research proposal related to occupational health psychology. This course is highly recommended for students exploring the option of graduate school, as it will be structured in a way that largely emulates a grad-school level course.

Prerequisites

PSY 2012 Intro Psych and PSY 3213 Research Methods

How to Enroll

No advance permission or course permit is required.


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Bayesian Stats I (Fall 2017, CRN 90758, PSY 4931-010)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Ken Malmberg
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30am to 10:45am
Location: PCD 2122

Course Description

Welcome to the Bayesian revolution! Actually, the revolution began many years ago, but it has only recently gained traction in Psychological Science. The goal of this two-semester course is to provide students with a solid foundation in probability theory and data analysis within a Bayesian framework. In the first semester, we will begin with a historical discussion of the Frequentist (Fisherian) framework of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing versus the Bayesian framework of probabilistic inference. We will then cover the basics of probability theory, Bayes Rule, and their applications to inferring binomial proportions (e.g., events that occurred or did not occur, members of one group A versus group B, etc.). Finally, we will cover the Metropolis Algorithm and Monte Carlo Markov Chains using Gibbs sampling. To carry out course assignments, students will use the open source R statistical and WINBUGS packages. No experience in traditional statistics or computer programming is required. Programming in the R language and JAGS will be taught as part of the course. In the second semester, we will use the knowledge gained in the first semester to conduct Bayesian hierarchical analogues of t-tests, ANOVAs, and regression.


Texts:

Doing Bayesian Data Analysis: A Tutorial with R and BUGS, Kruschke, Academic press. 1st Ed. ISBN: 978-0-12-381485-2

The Theory That Would Not Die: How Bayes' Rule Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines, and Emerged Triumphant from Two Centuries of Controversy, McGrayne, 1st Ed. ISBN: 978-0300169690

Moneyball, Lewis, ISBN: 978-0393338393


Questions: malmberg@usf.edu

Prerequisites

PSY 3213 - Research Methods in Psychology

How to Enroll

Students should contact Dr. Malmberg directly for permission to enroll: malmberg@usf.edu


course list