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PSY 4931 Selected Topics, Community Practicum and Community Internship Course Information

Important: Some Selected Topics courses require the successful completion of Research Methods in Psychology, PSY 3213. Check the individual course descriptions for details.


Community Internship (Summer 2018, CRN 56273, IDS 4942-002 & Fall 2018, CRN 92213, IDS 4942-005)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Vicky Phares
Time: N/A
Location: N/A

Course Description

The Community Internship (IDS 4942) credit option is offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer sessions whereby students can work at pre-approved internship sites or they can seek out their own internship sites and then register for variable amounts of credit depending on their desired work schedule. Students are responsible for securing their own internship. There are no additional requirements for IDS 4942 other than working at the internship (e.g., no class meeting, no assignments, etc.).

Once students secure an internship opportunity (either on their own or via the pre-approved internship list), they should contact the USF community internship instructor to get approval for that internship experience. If not already on the pre-approved list, all internship sites need to be vetted and approved by a faculty member in the USF Department of Psychology.

On-site supervision will be provided at the internship by a professional with at least a Bachelor’s degree and two years of experience in their field. On-site supervisors will need to confirm the students' position at the beginning of the semester and again confirm the students' acceptable work at the end of the semester. For Summer, 2018 and Fall, 2018, the instructor is Dr. Vicky Phares: phares@usf.edu

Credits are as follows: 1 credit (for 3 or more hours/week at the internship = 45 total hours), 2 credits (for 4 or more hours/week at the internship = 60 total hours), or 3 credits (for 8 hours/week or more at the internship = 120 total hours), or 4 credits (for 11 hours/week or more at the internship = 165 total hours).

Because the summer term is shorter than the fall or spring, the suggested hours per week for Summer Session C are as follows: 1 credit (for 4 1/2 or more hours/week at the internship = 45 total hours), 2 credits (for 6 or more hours/week at the internship = 60 total hours), or 3 credits (for 12 hours/week or more at the internship = 120 total hours), or 4 credits (for 16 1/2 hours/week or more at the internship = 165 total hours).

The Community Internship (IDS 4942) is offered on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading basis.

Internships can include experiences in any topic that is relevant to psychology, including but not limited to: Mental health, substance abuse, behavioral health, legal issues, forensic psychology, jury selection, community problems, therapeutic communities, industrial organizational psychology, business psychology, human resources, animal behavior, applied behavior analysis, test development, the assessment process, applications of basic research, psychosocial oncology, health sciences, child development, social processes, aging studies, and the elderly.

Please note that no more than 3 hours of PSY 4913 Directed Study, PSY 4970 Honors Thesis, CLP 4941 Community Practicum, or IDS 4942 Community Internship (combined) can count toward the major. Additional credits will count toward general elective credit towards the 120 hours required for the degree. 3 hours of CLP 4941 or IDS 4942 can count toward the minor in Psychology.

Note that internship credits do not count against the calculation of excess credits.

Prerequisites

None

How to Enroll

Course is by instructor approval only. Please send the following information to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu)

  • Your name and U number
  • Your e-mail address
  • The semester in which you wish to enroll in the course
  • The number of credit hours in which you will be enrolling
  • The name of the internship site and name of your supervisor at the internship site

For Summer session only, if you wish to have an internship site assigned to you based on your interests, then please e-mail Dr. Vicky Phares with the following information (phares@usf.edu)

  • Your name
  • Your e-mail address
  • Your U number
  • The semester in which you wish to enroll in the course
  • When you plan to graduate
  • Also, please have a professor, graduate student, or other professional (such as a supervisor from work, even if not psychology-related) confirm the following statement via e-mail to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu): "I support                     ’s request to be assigned to an internship at a community social service agency."


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Community Practicum in Mental Health (Fall 2018, CRN 91645, CLP 4941)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Vicky Phares
Time: Mondays, 8:00 AM to 8:50 AM (plus 8 hours/week in a community agency)
Location: PCD 1147

Course Description

This course is a service learning course where undergraduate students will be assigned to volunteer in a pre-approved community agency for 8 hours/week and will attend a one-hour in-person lecture/discussion. Course material will cover ethics, confidentiality, issues related to mental health, and working in community agencies. Reflective writing assignments will be included in the course. In addition to material posted to Canvas, the required book is:
      Matthews, J.R., & Walker, C. E. (2015). Your practicum in psychology: A guide for maximizing knowledge and competence (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Community Practicum in Mental Health is taught in the Fall and Spring semesters.

Community agency options include mental health facilities, substance use disorder treatment facilities, social service agencies serving impoverished youth and elderly, residential facilities for children in foster care, and prevention programs for youth at risk for mental health problems. On-site supervision will be provided for at least one hour/week of the 8 hour/week commitment. Many agencies require background checks (approximately $70); some require a background check as well as drug screening (approximately $125); some require malpractice insurance ($35).

Once students are approved for the class and given a permit to enroll, they will be asked to rank their preferences for the agency where they would like to gain this experience. Many of the background checks and paperwork will need to be completed long before the start of the semester.

For that reason, priority will be given to students who have enrolled in this class at least one month prior to the beginning of the semester. We hope to have all of the background checks and paperwork done well before the beginning of classes, so that students can gain the full experience of the internship during the semester.

Priority will be given to graduating seniors.

If a student is already volunteering at a community agency and wants to join the course and receive credit for new volunteer hours at that site (8 hours/week plus course attendance and course work during the semester then please email Dr. Phares (phares@usf.edu).

Please note that no more than 3 hours of PSY 4913 Directed Study, PSY 4970 Honors Thesis, CLP 4941 Community Practicum, or IDS 4942 Community Internship (combined) can count toward the major. Additional credits will count toward general elective credit towards the 120 hours required for the degree. 3 hours of CLP 4941 or IDS 4942 can count toward the minor in Psychology.

Note that internship credits do not count against the calculation of excess credits.

Prerequisites

None

How to Enroll

Course is by instructor approval only. Please e-mail Dr. Vicky Phares with the following information (phares@usf.edu):

  • Your name
  • Your e-mail address
  • Your U number
  • When you plan to graduate
  • Also, please have a professor, graduate student, or other professional (such as a supervisor from work, even if not psychology-related) confirm the following statement via e-mail to Dr. Vicky Phares (phares@usf.edu): "I support                     ’s request to be assigned to an internship at a community social service agency."


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Stereotypes and Prejudice (Fall 2018, CRN 83329, PSY 4931-004)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Jennifer Bosson
Time: Tuesdays, 12:30 PM to 3:15 PM
Location: PCD 2125

Course Description

Stereotypes and Prejudice is a graduate student level seminar that is open to undergraduate students who are ready to perform at the level of a graduate student and who meet the requirements listed below.

Stereotypes and prejudice have been topics of great interest to social psychologists for decades. At present, there are several large research literatures devoted to understanding how and why we form stereotypes and feel prejudice toward those who are different from us. This course will introduce you to a sampling of social psychological work (and occasionally influential work from other disciplines) on stereotypes and prejudice, including both classic and contemporary theories and research. Topics include: What are the causes of stereotypes and prejudices? What functions do they serve? Can we avoid them? What effects do stereotypes and prejudice have on their targets? Is it possible to overcome our tendencies toward prejudice? While the course primarily adopts a social psychological perspective on the topic of stereotypes and prejudice, the material should be relevant and useful to students from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds.

The format of the class is discussion-oriented, with discussions focusing on analyzing the readings and identifying unresolved issues and lingering questions. Because the quality of our discussions depends on the thoughtful input of all participants, students are expected to read and think about the readings before class. Students will submit 1-2 discussion points before each class. In addition, students will each be the discussion facilitator for one or two class sessions. There is also a paper requirement consisting of an APA style research proposal on a topic related to stereotypes and/or prejudice.

Prerequisites

  • Junior/Senior status
  • Introduction to Psychological Science, Statistics, Research Methods, and Social Psychology
  • Research experience is recommended
  • GPA of 3.5 or higher

How to Enroll

Interested students should email Dr. Bosson for permission to register: jbosson@usf.edu - the email should explain why they are a good fit for the course and address the recommended criteria. Then, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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Child and Adolescent Social Development (Fall 2018, CRN 82770, PSY 4931-005)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Tiina Ojanen
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30 PM to 4:45 PM
Location: PCD 2124

Course Description

This course focuses on youth aggression and prosocial development. Among other topics, we will cover developmental predictors and adjustment implications of various forms of aggression, school bullying and victimization, peer influences on aggression (e.g., social power and popularity) and examine key topics in prosocial development, such as attachment security, empathy, morality, and prosocial behavior. We will also cover "hot" topics like school shootings, the "dark triad" traits underlying aggression, and the latest research on types of prosocial behaviors. This class is for Psychology Majors & Minors, and supports various graduate school and career paths, including but not limited to developmental, social, school, clinical, and educational psychology, public health, sociology, counseling, nursing and pediatrics. Teaching integrates latest knowledge across e.g., developmental, clinical and social psychology.

Note: students may list this course as professional expertise in graduate school and/or job applications.

To complete this class, students read and discuss research articles in a small seminar environment, and complete exams and writing assignments. Traditional teaching using ppt files is also included. All materials will be provided by the Instructor (no text book).

Prerequisites

Recommended academic background

  • Introduction to Psychological Science and Research Methods or Statistics with grades of B or better
  • major GPA (including all attempts) of 3.2 or better
  • overall GPA of 3.00 or better
  • motivation to learn about the course content
  • strong reading, writing and analytic skills

How to Enroll

Inquiries

For any questions, please contact Dr. Tiina Ojanen at tojanen@usf.edu.


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Fraud and Deception in Medical Research (Fall 2018, CRN 85016, PSY 4931-006)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. David Diamond
Time: Mondays, 3:00PM to 5:30 PM
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

This course focuses on poorly designed and biased health-related research which has led to misinformation on nutritional and medical treatment guidelines. Students will have the opportunity to explore how big business interests have corrupted health-related research. The following are examples of myths that are covered in the course: A vegetarian diet is healthier than a meat-based diet; High cholesterol levels cause heart disease; Cholesterol lowering drugs (statins) are beneficial for health; Red meat and a high fat diet increase the risk of heart disease and cancer; A daily aspirin reduces the risk of heart disease; Fluoridated water is beneficial and safe; Annual mammograms prolong life; The low carbohydrate diet is unhealthy; The flu vaccine has been shown to reduce flu incidence and duration. There are no exams. Grading will be based on the student’s oral presentations of book chapters and research papers and class participation.

Prerequisites

None

How to Enroll

A permit is not required for students who have completed PSY 3213. If you have not completed PSY 3213, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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The Mind and the Brain (Fall 2018, CRN 83524, PSY 4931-007)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Emanuel Donchin
Time: Mondays, 9:30 AM to 11:15 AM
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

This class provides each of the students with the opportunity to examine in detail an issue in the Mind/Brain domain. The students are free to choose any topic that is related to the role of the brain in implementing the Mind and controlling behavior. Students will choose topics and develop a project focusing on their topic. Students can work either individually or in teams.

The course will begin with a series of lectures that will provide a broad survey of Cognitive Neuroscience highlighting the range of topics that match the students' interest. No text book is assigned to the class. The reading materials are all primary scientific papers focused on the student's projects. The relevant papers are uploaded to Canvas.

Students may choose to work as teams of 2 or 3 students per team. A team will be collectively responsible for the team's poster, but each team member will write a separate term paper.

About half way thru the semester class sessions are devoted to cycles of student presentations of their projects as we work to develop the final presentation of the project at the course Grand Finale which is a "Science Fair" that will be held on the last Monday of the semester. Each team will prepare a poster presenting its project. The Science Fair is attended by staff of the Honors College, faculty and students from Psychology and your friends and relatives.

The poster presentations are prepared with Power Point and printed at the campus Computer Store. The printing cost is covered by the course budget.

Each student will have to prepare a written report of the project, at least 8 pages in length. Each member of a team will have to write an individual report.

Prerequisites

Prior completion of PSY 3213 is not required.

How to Enroll


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Psychology and Technology (Fall 2018, CRN 85022, PSY 4931-009)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Michael Coovert
Time: Tuesdays 9:00 AM to 11:45 AM
Location: PCD 2122

Course Description

Recent advances in technology have dramatically altered the manner in which organizations function, transforming the way people think about and perform their work. The implications of these trends continue to evolve as emerging innovations adapt to and are adapted by organizations, workers, and other components of the socio-technical systems in which they are embedded. A consideration of these implications is needed to understand, manage, and drive the reciprocal interplay between technology and the workplace. This course is a seminar and brings together readings from top scholars within and outside of the field of industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology to explore the psychological and organizational effects of contemporary workplace technologies. Students will be exposed to various techniques including: basic programming in Python and R, Github, and machine learning. Grades will be based on: participation, module projects, and a final project.

Prerequisites

  • PSY 3213 - Research Methods in Psychology
  • 3.0 GPA
  • Junior/Senior Standing

How to Enroll

Interested students should submit the online Course Permit Request form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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Bayesian Stats I (Fall 2018, CRN 89088, PSY 4931-010)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Ken Malmberg
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:30 AM to 10:45 AM
Location: PCD 2122

Course Description

Welcome to the Bayesian revolution! Actually, the revolution began many years ago, but it has only recently gained traction in Psychological Science. The goal of this two-semester course is to provide students with a solid foundation in probability theory and data analysis within a Bayesian framework. In the first semester, we will begin with a historical discussion of the Frequentist (Fisherian) framework of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing versus the Bayesian framework of probabilistic inference. We will then cover the basics of probability theory, Bayes Rule, and their applications to inferring binomial proportions (e.g., events that occurred or did not occur, members of one group A versus group B, etc.). Finally, we will cover the Metropolis Algorithm and Monte Carlo Markov Chains using Gibbs sampling. To carry out course assignments, students will use the open source R statistical and WINBUGS packages. No experience in traditional statistics or computer programming is required. Programming in the R language and JAGS will be taught as part of the course. In the second semester, we will use the knowledge gained in the first semester to conduct Bayesian hierarchical analogues of t-tests, ANOVAs, and regression.

Texts:
Doing Bayesian Data Analysis: A Tutorial with R and BUGS, Kruschke, Academic press. 1st Ed. ISBN: 978-0-12-381485-2
The Theory That Would Not Die: How Bayes' Rule Cracked the Enigma Code, Hunted Down Russian Submarines, and Emerged Triumphant from Two Centuries of Controversy, McGrayne, 1st Ed. ISBN: 978-0300169690
Moneyball, Lewis, ISBN: 978-0393338393

Questions: malmberg@usf.edu

Prerequisites

PSY 3213 - Research Methods in Psychology

How to Enroll

Students should contact Dr. Malmberg directly for permission to enroll: malmberg@usf.edu


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Occupational Health Psychology (Fall 2018, CRN 85790, PSY 4931-011)

Course Information

Instructor: Maryana Arvan, M.A.
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:30 PM to 7:45 PM
Location: PCD 1146

Course Description

The average American spends over 1,800 hours at work every year. During this time, tens of millions will experience psychological abuse or prolonged sleep deprivation, millions will experience an accident on the job, and nearly a million will be physically assaulted while at work. Many of us can draw on our own work experiences, or the experiences of those around us, to support the idea that workplace can have a profound impact on our health and well-being. Occupational Health Psychology is a field that takes a science-based approach to this idea, and is dedicated to understanding how work can improve or compromise employee wellness.

The Occupational Health Psychology course will cover a wide variety of issues related to employee health, safety, and well-being. It is open to students across campus who are interested in learning more about the psychological and physical factors that pose a threat to employee well-being, and what companies and employees can do to avoid them.

Included are a variety of topics that contribute to stressful experiences on the job, including (lack of) psychological detachment, emotional labor, work-family issues, workplace mistreatment, post-traumatic stress, and accidents and injuries. Students will learn how these and other factors are linked to employee mental and physical health, safety, and overall well-being. We will also discuss what organizations can do to enhance employee wellness and promote employee engagement and flourishing.

This will be a seminar style course, in which students will be expected to read and discuss weekly readings. Each student will be guided in developing their own research proposal related to occupational health psychology.

Prerequisites

None

How to Enroll

A permit is not required for students who have completed PSY 3213. If you have not completed PSY 3213, complete the online Course Permit Request Form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


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Judgment and Decision Making (Fall 2018, CRN 87761, PSY 4931-013)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Sandra Schneider
Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:00 PM to 3:15 PM
Location: PCD 2124

Course Description

This course provides a broad perspective for understanding and improving human judgment and decision making based on theoretical and empirical advances in the field. The course focuses on the interplay between motivational and cognitive processes that influence the quality of our judgments and decisions. Topics include how we recognize and evaluate situations, how we deal with risk and uncertainty, influences from our previous experiences and our desires, and tradeoffs we make between immediate and longer term goals. Throughout, we will explore evidence suggesting how psychological systems help us to learn, adapt, and to efficiently make decisions, while at the same time leave us prone to various forms of bias and vulnerable to certain kinds of errors in our judgments and decisions. Students will be actively involved in exercises and assignments to increase insight into their own judgment and decision processes.

Prerequisites

  • Junior/senior status (preferred)
  • Overall GPA of 3.2 or better (preferred)
  • Successful completion of PSY 3213 Research Methods (required)

How to Enroll

No advance permission or course permit is required for students who have completed PSY 3213 with a C or better


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Discovering Research in Psychology (Fall 2018, CRN 91392, PSY 4215-001)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Judith B. Bryant
Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30 PM to 1:45 PM
Location: PCD 1134

Course Description

This course meets the University’s FKL Capstone requirement and is designated a USF Service-Learning Course.

Did you know that neuroscientist Joseph Ledoux first became interested in brains while working in a butcher shop? Or that physicist Richard Feynman (perhaps you’ve heard of him from The Big Bang Theory) loved solving real-world problems and invented a way to cut string beans efficiently when he worked in a hotel kitchen? Noted developmental psychologist Fran Horowitz got some of her theoretical ideas working as an elementary school teacher, one of the few jobs acceptable for women at the time. You will learn about these and other research journeys in Discovering Research in Psychology, a course designed to help you on your own potential research journey.

In this course we will explore the science of psychology. The course is designed to stimulate your interest in becoming an active participant in the research process and provide basic research skills. It also aims to familiarize you with some of the kinds of research that faculty and students in the Psychology Department conduct and how and why you might become involved. A third objective of the course is to help you decide whether to apply to the department’s Honors Program and ultimately apply to graduate school for a research-related degree. Students who successfully complete this class will have a greater chance of being admitted to the department’s Honors Program.

The course will focus on three broad themes: the people, problems, and processes of research. You will learn what kinds of individuals are involved in research, the skills and characteristics they bring to the research endeavor, their professional training, and how they became involved in research. With respect to problems, you will learn about the range of topics often encountered in psychological research. You will also consider the personal and scholarly challenges researchers face in addressing their questions of interest. Finally, you will consider how to identify a good problem, frame a research question, and design a strategy to try to answer the question. In doing so, you will see how systematic inquiry occurs in psychology and be exposed to some methods used for conducting psychological research and how they yield knowledge. As part of the course you will also learn how to analyze research information critically.

Participants will hear presentations by some of the Psychology Department’s most outstanding faculty and student researchers and may take field trips to research sites. To prepare for these classes, you will read journal articles by the researchers and review the researchers’ curriculum vitae (academic resumes). You will also read scholars’ accounts of how they became involved in research. You will reflect on, discuss, and write about these presentations and readings. In addition, you will gain experience in some parts of the research process (e.g., dealing with ethical considerations). You will interview researchers in Psychology and related disciplines. Finally, you will explore options for becoming involved in research yourself.

Requirements include active participation in the class, short weekly papers about presentations and readings, interviews with researchers, research brain teasers, research ethics training, library resources projects, a curriculum vitae and personal statement project, a paper discussing yourself as a possible researcher, and a final exam.

Prerequisites

Selection Criteria

  • Introduction to Psychological Science and Research Methods with grades of B or better,
  • major GPA (including all attempts) of 3.2 or better,
  • overall GPA of 3.0 or better,
  • interest in learning about the research process,
  • and consent of instructor.

Exceptions may be made for students entering USF in summer or fall 2018 from another college or university.

Recommended Criteria

  • strong writing and analytic skills,
  • an interest in becoming involved in research in psychology,
  • intent to graduate no earlier than December 2019 to leave open the possibility of applying to the 2019 Psychology Department Honors Program

How to Enroll

First, complete the online permission to register form found on the Psychology Department website. Next, please send Dr. Bryant an e-mail (judithbryant@usf.edu) explaining briefly why you think this would be a useful class and how you meet the selection criteria.


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Cognitive Modeling (Fall 2018, CRN 95522, PSY 4931-024)

Course Information

Instructor: Dr. Chad Dube
Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 3:30 PM to 4:45 PM
Location: PCD 2124

Course Description

In this course, we will learn about computational models of cognition as well as measurement models. In doing so, we will complement theory with hands-on programming and model fitting. More specifically, we will read and present on papers dealing with models and aspects of modeling, and will mix this in with exercises in computer programming using languages such as R to actually implement these modeling techniques to simulate and fit actual data. Cognitive models are models that specify details of the mental process that results in observable responses. Measurement models, on the other hand, are less specific about the cognitive process but can still be fit to data to provide a detailed description beyond standard analytical techniques. For instance, the Ex-Gaussian function can be fit to observed RT distributions and results in parameters that separately describe changes in the center, spread, and degree of skew. Advanced graduate students are encouraged to bring their own data and to explore modeling techniques of their choice in the literature that the instructor will help them to implement in a script to better understand their data. Prior programming or higher mathematics experience, though helpful, is not necessary or assumed.

Prerequisites

B+ or better in PSY 3204 or other statistics course
B+ or better in PSY 3213 - Research Methods in Psychology

How to Enroll

Interested students should submit the online Course Permit Request form at http://psychology.usf.edu/forms/CoursePermit.aspx.


course list